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Pima Indian legends.

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Published by University of Arizona Press in [Tucson] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Pima Indians -- Folklore,
  • Pima Indians -- Folklore,
  • Indians of North America -- Folklore

Book details:

About the Edition

Twenty-four Pima Indian tales about traditional subjects and characters of folklore such as Coyote, Elder Brother, and Roadrunner.

Edition Notes

StatementIllus. by Matt Tashquinth.
ContributionsTashquinth, Matt, illus.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE99.P6 S5 1968
The Physical Object
Paginationxv, 111 p.
Number of Pages111
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5606323M
LC Control Number68013547

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Pima Indian Legends. Anna Moore Shaw (Author) Paperback ($), Ebook "The legends trace the origin myths and development of the Pima, and continue by presenting some Piman folk heroes such as Coyote and Roadrunner. Those who like to keep up on the southwestern folk hero (or anti-hero) Coyote will discover a number of delightful tales of. Anna Moore Shaw, author of Pima Indian Legends and A Pima Past, was born in a traditional brush dwelling on the Gila River Reservation in In she received her high school diploma and married Ross Shaw, a Pima-Maricopa man. After more than forty years of distinguished civic and religious activity in Phoenix, the couple returned to the Salt River Reservation, where they focused their /5(7). Get this from a library! Pima Indian legends. [Anna Moore Shaw; Matt Tashquinth] -- Twenty-four Pima Indian tales about traditional subjects and characters of .   This is a great little book about the Pima Indian legends. If you are interested in the Southwest and the native Indian culture, this is a very good read/5.

  Anna Moore Shaw, author of Pima Indian Legends and A Pima Past, was born in a traditional brush dwelling on the Gila River Reservation in In she received her high school diploma and married Ross Shaw, a Pima-Maricopa man. After more than forty years of distinguished civic and religious activity in Phoenix, the couple returned to the Salt River Reservation, where they Brand: University of Arizona Press. As the dean of Arizona-Sonora desert native cultures, Edward H. Spicer, wrote in his foreword to George Webb’s A Pima Remembers, it is a genial introduction to Pima (Akimel O'Odham—River People) traditional lifeways. The author is not born (it was in ) until halfway through the by: Pima Indian legends. Tempe, Indian Education Center, College of Education, Arizona State University, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Anna Moore Shaw. Coyote, Eagle-man, quail, bear, and other charaters relate their adventures in two dozen delightful tales Anna Shaw heard her father tell when she was young. The author, a Pima herself, unfolds twenty-four charming Indian tales as passed down from generation to by: 9.

Pima Indian legends. [Anna Moore Shaw; Matt Tashquinth] -- Twenty-four Pima Indian tales about traditional subjects and characters of folklore such as Coyote, Elder Brother, and Roadrunner. # Book collections on Project MUSE.\/span>\n \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\n schema. Aw-aw-tam Indian Nights The Myths and Legends of the Pimas by J. William Lloyd [] This is a rare book of Pima folklore, transcribed by a sympathetic amateur ethnographer at the beginning of the twentieth century. The Pima live in the arid deserts of southern Arizona, and originally survived by horticulture and hunting/gathering. out of 5 stars Very Informative about the Pima People Reviewed in the United States on Ap Very informative book, but somewhat (understandably) difficult to read due to the Pima words.4/5(1). The Pima / ˈ p iː m ə / (or Akimel O'odham, also spelled Akimel Oʼotham, "River People", formerly known as Pima) are a group of Native Americans living in an area consisting of what is now central and southern majority population of the surviving two bands of the Akimel O'odham are based in two reservations: the Keli Akimel Oʼotham on the Gila River Indian Community (GRIC) and.